Our Health Library information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist our patients to learn more about their health. Our providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Interactive Tool: What Is Your Stress Level?

What does this tool help you learn?

Although everyone responds differently, major life changes are some of the biggest causes of stress, both positive and negative. This interactive tool gauges your stress level based on the number of life changes you have had recently. Your score shows a rough estimate of your current stress level and the likelihood that you will have health problems due to stress in the next 12 to 18 months.

Check all of the events that have occurred in the past 6 months to find out your stress score.

Adapted with permission from: Miller MA, Rahe RH (1997). Life changes scaling for the 1990s. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 43(3): 279–292.

What does your score mean?

After you use this interactive tool, you will be better able to see how much stress life changes are causing you. Your score will appear as one of the following:

  • You have low stress.
  • You have mild stress.
  • You have moderate stress.
  • You have high stress.

If you have a moderate or high stress level, you are more likely to develop a stress-related illness in the near future.

As with all screening tools, the results of this tool are only an estimate. The way you deal with stress depends on several things. These include your ability to cope with change (resiliency), how significant life events are to you, and how much support you get from family and friends. There may also be events that cause you stress that are not included in this tool.

Your results can give you a rough measurement of your stress level due to life changes. If you have moderate or high amounts of stress in your life, consider what you can do to avoid adding more stress to your life and what you can do to cope with current stress.

What's next?

There are a number of things you can do to cope well with life stress. For more information on stress and what you can do about it, see the topics Stress Management and Managing Job Stress.

Credits

Current as of: January 31, 2020

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review: Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Lisa S. Weinstock MD - Psychiatry

References

Other Works Consulted

  • Miller MA, Rahe RH (1997). Life changes scaling for the 1990s. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 43(3): 279–292.

Your Safety and Well-being is our Priority

On behalf of all of us at Women’s Health Partners, in these difficult times, we want to thank you for your support and confidence in our practice.

We want you to personally know that our patients’ health and well-being has and always will be our number one priority. This reminder bears repeating in the face of any challenges and especially now, given concerns posed by the corona virus (COVID-19) pandemic.

We are taking all necessary precautions to ensure your safety and well-being and that of our staff. To that end, we want to share some of the steps we are taking:

Furthermore, our staff will be asking several screening questions regarding your health. We ask that you do not enter our office if you, or someone in your family, or someone you recently were in contact with, has exhibited flu-like symptoms such as fever, cough, shortness of breath, severe muscle aches, shaking chills, or recent loss of taste or smell, or recently diagnosed with COVID19.

In order to help us participate with our social distancing effort, we are asking patients to enter the office without any visitors, including children.

You will also have the option of waiting in your car instead of the waiting room after you have checked in. The front desk staff will call your cell phone when we are ready for you to come in for your visit.

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